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SAUSALITO PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND TENANT PLACEMENT

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See Why Sausalito Property Owners Love Zenplace

Zenplace provides industry-leading property management for Sausalito, tenant placement, and leasing services in Sausalito. We are faster, better, and provide more value - as featured in top publications. We look forward to leasing and managing your property - and your joining our happy Sausalito property owners!


Why Choose Zenplace Property Management?

Your property is among your most valuable assets. We will help you make the most of your property given our proven expertise and experience.

Zenplace is providing owners with innovative full-service rental and management.
Engadget logo Zenplace combines experienced property management professionals with decades of experience with next-generation technology.
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Full Service Award-Winning Property Management

We strive everyday to exceed your expectations with our property management services. We provide an industry-first 100% owner happiness guarantee.

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Higher Returns and Peace of Mind for Property Owners

Zenplace uses experienced professionals, data-driven insights, and innovative technology to provide industry-leading property management services.

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Our owner portal provides you with up-to-date information on your property, tenant placement, rental income, maintenance and 24/7 communication.

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Our tenant portal enables a better rental experience and enhances your property.

Some Of Our Happy Customers

We serve a large number of great properties ranging from skycrapers to single family homes, and everything in between.

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Sausalito Area Information

Sausalito Area

Sausalito was once the site of a Coast Miwok settlement known as Liwanelowa. The branch of the Coast Miwok living in this area were known as the Huimen (or as Nación de Uimen to the Spanish). Early explorers of the area described them as friendly and hospitable. According to Juan de Ayala, "To all these advantages must be added the best of all, which is that the heathen Indians of the port are so faithful in their friendship and so docile in their disposition that I was greatly pleased to receive them on board." Such placidity was likely a contributing factor to their complete displacement, which took place within the span of a few generations. As historian Jack Tracy has observed, "Their dwellings on the site of Sausalito were explored and mapped in 1907, nearly a century and a half later, by an archaeological survey. By that time, nothing was left of the culture of those who had first enjoyed the natural treasures of the bay. The life of the Coastal Miwoks had been reduced to archaeological remnants, as though thousands of years had passed since their existence."

The first European known to visit the present-day location of Sausalito was Don José de Cañizares, on August 5, 1775. Cañizares was head of an advance party dispatched by longboat from the ship San Carlos, searching for a suitable anchorage for the larger vessel. The crew of the San Carlos came ashore soon after, reporting friendly natives and teeming populations of deer, elk, bear, sea lions, seals and otters. More significantly for maritime purposes, they reported an abundance of large, mature timber in the hills, a valuable commodity for shipwrights in need of raw materials for masts, braces and planking.

Despite these and later positive reports, the Spanish colonial government of Upper California did little to establish a presence in the area. When a military garrison (now the Presidio of San Francisco) and a Franciscan mission (Mission Dolores) were founded the following year, they were situated on the opposite, southern shore of the bay, where no portage was necessary for overland traffic to and from Monterey, the regional capitol. As a result, the far shore of the Golden Gate strait would remain largely wilderness for another half-century.

The development of the area began at the instigation of William A. Richardson, who arrived in Upper California in 1822, shortly after Mexico had won its independence from Spain. An English mariner who had picked up a fluency in Spanish during his travels, he quickly became an influential presence in the now-Mexican territory. By 1825, Richardson had assumed Mexican citizenship, converted to Catholicism and married the daughter of Don Ignacio Martínez, commandant of the Presidio and holder of a large land grant. His ambitions now expanding to land holdings of his own, Richardson submitted a petition to Governor Echienda for a rancho in the headlands across the water from the Presidio, to be called "Rancho Saucelito". Sausalito is believed to refer to a small cluster of willows, a most-soil tree, indicating the presence of a freshwater spring.

Even before filing his claim, Richardson had used the spring as a watering station on the shores of what is now called Richardson Bay (an arm of the larger San Francisco Bay), selling fresh water to visiting vessels. However, his ownership of the land was legally tenuous: other claims had been submitted for the same region, and at any rate Mexican law reserved headlands for military uses, not private ownership. Richardson temporarily abandoned his claim and settled instead outside the Presidio, building the first permanent civilian home and laying out the street plan for the pueblo of Yerba Buena (present-day San Francisco). After years of lobbying and legal wrangling, Richardson was given clear title to all 19,751 acres (79.93 km2) of Rancho del Sausalito on February 11, 1838.


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